Nuclear Regulators launch environmental consultation on UK ABWR
13 December, 2016

Nuclear Regulators launch environmental consultation on UK ABWR

Nuclear Regulators launch environmental consultation on UK ABWR

Contacts: Lowri Joyce +44 (0)7464 980 601 lowri.joyce@hitachi-hne.com Tris Denton +44 (0)7824 408 059 tristram.denton@hitachi-hne.com Nuclear Regulators launch environmental consultation on UK ABWR London, 12 December 2016 – Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. (Hitachi-GE)’s UK Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (UK ABWR) will be the focus of a consultation launched today by the UKs environmental regulators, as part of their assessment of the design prior to deployment in the UK.

Generic Design Assessment - a joint process undertaken by the Office for Nuclear Regulation, the Environment Agency, and Natural Resources Wales – aims to ensure that new nuclear power stations built in the UK meet the high standards of safety, security, environmental protection and waste management.

The consultation seeks the public’s views on the preliminary conclusions of the Environment Agency and Natural Resources Wales regarding the environmental aspects of the design, explaining how they’ve conducted their assessment, their findings from the assessment and what will happen next. President and Representative Director of Hitachi-GE, Hidetoshi Takehara, said: “The consultation is another great opportunity to engage with the assessment, to make comments and ask questions. We have worked hard with the regulators for nearly four years to facilitate their assessment of our design – we are pleased that EA and NRW are ready to put their preliminary finding to the public for comment.

” “The UK ABWR is a tried, tested and proven operational design. We look forward to sustained progress through GDA, and are optimistic that UK ABWRs will play a vital role in providing clean, secure and affordable energy to the UK in the years ahead.

” Alongside the consultation, Hitachi-GE has also published its latest environmental submissions at: http://www.hitachi-hgne-uk-abwr.com/gda_library.html Notes to editors:  Hitachi has been continuously involved in the construction of nuclear power plants for more than 40 years. Hitachi has participated in the design, development and construction of 23 nuclear power plants within Japan, including BWR and four Advanced Boiling Water Reactors – the world’s most advanced operational design.

The ABWR has four operational units at three sites in Japan and a further five units in construction; two in Taiwan and three in Japan.

 The UK ABWR is planned for deployment by Horizon Nuclear Power at two sites: Wylfa Newydd on the Isle of Anglesey, and Oldbury-on-Severn in South Gloucestershire.

EA and NRW’s 12 week consultation will run from the 12 December 2016 to the 3 March 2017. The regulators will host events near these proposed UK ABWR sites.

 Wylfa Newydd is being developed by Horizon Nuclear Power a 100% subsidiary of Hitachi Ltd. Horizon Nuclear Power is supported by Menter Newydd and their contractors, including Hitachi-GE. Wylfa Newydd project represents a multi-billion pound investment in UK infrastructure and will create tens of thousands of British jobs. For more information, visit www.horizonnuclearpower.com  For more information on the Generic Design Assessment (GDA), visit http://www.onr.org.uk/  For the consultation specific web pages, visit: The Environment Agency: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/gda-of- hitachi-ge-nuclear-energy-ltds-uk-advanced-boiling-water-reactor Natural Resources Wales: https://naturalresources.wales/about- us/consultations/our-own-consultations/?lang=en About Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. Hitachi-GE, a joint venture established by Hitachi, Ltd. and GE in July 2007, as one of the world’s leading comprehensive plant manufacturers, engages in the development, planning, design, manufacture, inspection, installation, pre-operation, and maintenance of nuclear reactor-related equipment and is able to execute integrated project management. Hitachi-GE has been involved with 23 reactors in Japan to date, including those currently under construction.

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